Club Success Plan Meeting

Are you a new Toastmasters club officer?  Have you heard about the club success plan meeting?

I got a message on Linked In last week from Roy Monarch, a Toastmaster from the Word Doctors club in Texas.  He asked, “Do you have a plan what we could model as we work on our first DCP plan?”

No, I didn’t plant that.

It’s gratifying to hear from a listener – and then to be asked such a good question just at the time we need to answer it makes my day.

Today, we’ll talk about the Toastmasters club success plan.  What can new club officers do now to become a distinguished club that is serving its members well?

INTRO

Do you want to change the world?  Do you need to develop the leadership skills to do that?  Then Toastmasters can help you achieve your goals in a proven program that teaches public speaking and leadership skills.  This is Toastmasters 101 and I’m your host, Kim Krajci.

The Club Success Plan

I know some people don’t like the Distinguished Club Program because they feel that some clubs want the title and short the members in the process.

Maybe some do.  Maybe some people cheat the system.  Frankly, it’s not very hard to save club awards from being posted to the system until next year.  Or a member can choose to not submit an award until the new Toastmasters year.

None of that changes that the Distinguished Club Program, as it stands, is a fine metric to show what a Toastmasters club should do to serve its members well.

Recently, I talked extensively about the DCP and each of the goals or points.  This week, I want to look at the mechanism a club needs to work to achieve these goals – and why.

Roy asked me about what new officers can do to make sure a club is successful.

My answer is pretty succinct:  work the program and earn awards that benefit you.  That means don’t do speeches that aren’t projects and get the evaluations so that you will improve.

Being a club officer doesn’t mean you sacrifice your own purpose to learn public speaking in being a member of Toastmasters.

In successful clubs, I’ve never seen a single club officer fail to work on their own skills.  I’ve seen some unsuccessful clubs – where speeches are given without being part of a project to get credit – those clubs often fail their members in other ways.  But what we often see is that the lack of project progress is a sign of a club that may not be taking seriously the growth of the members.

Remember – each project has a purpose.  Pathways education system is based on the objective to learn and practice a new skill.  When that purpose isn’t recognized by the speaker or the evaluator, the member will not progress in their skills.  We should probably do a show on that purpose statement on every evaluation form… but let’s get back to the club success plan for now.

So, if you’re a club officer – work your Pathway and reap the benefits that you joined Toastmasters to get.

Make the Club Succeed

Continue reading “Club Success Plan Meeting”

Distinguished Club Program and New Club Awards

Let’s talk about the Distinguished Club Program (DCP) and the new Toastmasters International Club Recognition Awards.

How do you know that a club is serving its members well?

Toastmasters International created a metric to help determine the strengths of a local club. We call it the Distinguished Club Program or DCP, because we Toastmasters love our acronyms.  It’s a list of 10 goals that a club can aim for over the course of the Toastmasters year.

Some people call them the DCP points. I’m not going to argue with you. In fact, just to be fair to both sides, I’ll be interchangeable in how I refer to them. Points or goals.

Intro

What’s your goal? Do you need to learn how to be a leader or how to address a crowd to achieve change in your world? Then take a look at Toastmasters – you can learn public speaking and leadership skills in a safe and fun environment. We’re meeting online – so feel free to reach out to a local club or any club that meets at a time that’s convenient for you. This is Toastmasters 101, and I’m your host, Kim Krajci.

Distinguished Club Program Points?  Goals?

Regardless of what you call them – points or goals – the DCP has been presented at all officer training sessions every year to be sure that the club officers understand their part in achieving these goals. Most of them are related to the members completing educational awards, such as the Competent Communicator award, or a Pathways Level completion, or the Distinguished Toastmaster award. Continue reading “Distinguished Club Program and New Club Awards”

Evaluating Online Speeches in Toastmasters

Evaluating online speeches:  how do we Toastmasters do it?

Getting a new computer.

For some people it’s exciting. It’s wonderful. A clean slate with speed and power.  Maybe now I can fill out evaluations on my computer and send them back to people?

Moving to a new computer for me isn’t really traumatic, but it is not a task I want to face. In fact, I’ve been putting it off for months. I had the new desktop sitting in its box right beside me but… until the last gasp of the old desktop warned me that I had to move now, I didn’t wanna.  There are the 10 bazillion miles of black cables…

A new computer opens up new opportunities for me.  Moving Toastmasters meetings online opens up new opportunities for all of us, such as evaluating online speeches.

INTRO

Are you ready to improve your public speaking and leadership skills?  Then you are ready for Toastmasters.  We’re an international organization that teaches these skills in a safe and fun environment.  Welcome to Toastmasters 101 and I’m your host, Kim Krajci.

Fillable PDFs

Evaluations are the one problem I have with having our clubs online.

Evaluations are the key component of Toastmasters. You can get public speaking training in a lot of places – most of them for a lot more money – but getting immediate feedback is where real growth is made. Continue reading “Evaluating Online Speeches in Toastmasters”

Working Toastmasters Pathways

What Order Should You Follow in Toastmasters Pathways?

“What good is skipping a step on a ladder?” Toastmasters Pathways were built to be done in order, right?

I saw this ladder analogy on the Official Toastmasters International Members Facebook Group this morning about a member who has completed their level 5 project – but had to skip completing Level 4 first.

I’d like to discuss the ways that we work our paths. How are you doing it?

INTRO

To be a leader, you have to have a good foundation in public speaking. In one hour a week at Toastmasters, you can learn the communication skills to reach your goals and achieve your dreams. This is Toastmasters 101 podcast. I’m your host, Kim Krajci.

Dropping the Walls

One of the biggest improvements in Toastmasters Pathways that I’ve seen is the dropping of the barriers between the levels. Continue reading “Working Toastmasters Pathways”

Prepare to Speak Professionally: Level 5 Elective

Maybe it’s because of who I follow on social media that I’ve gotten dozens of emails and social media ads that say “The best place to reach your customers is on the stage where they’ve come to hear you speak.” So you want to prepare to speak professionally.

That makes good sense. Instead of spamming thousands of people who will likely unsubscribe from your list, you find a place to speak and invite all the interested customers to come and hear you.

The push to become a professional, paid speaker is pretty fierce right now. Whether it’s a fad or recognition of a long-standing truth – there’s a push right now to learn how to speak professionally. And here’s Toastmasters, where it’s always been, getting our members ready to step up onto that stage. In Pathways, it’s a Level 5 elective: Prepare to Speak Professionally. Continue reading “Prepare to Speak Professionally: Level 5 Elective”

Pathways Choices: Resources to Help

It’s time to choose a pathway.  Pathways choices seem more complex this time around.

Decisions in Pathways Choices

There’s been a bit of grousing in Toastmasters land these days.  As the days of the Competent Communicator wane, I see a lot of people mourning a loss that maybe they didn’t expect.

Since I’m still working on a last CC manual, I guess I’m not ready to mourn just yet since I don’t miss it.  But as I make my pathways choices, I’m a bit nostaglic, not for the Competent Communicator, but for the simplicity of the advanced manuals.

Is choosing a pathway that difficult?

Only in my mind. Continue reading “Pathways Choices: Resources to Help”

Level 1 and Level 4: Taking Risks

This week, I took a risk and went to an exercise class that was advertised to be a low-impact workout.  I have issues with my feet, ankles, and knees, so a lot of jumping or running is not an option for me.

This class is probably a lot of fun for someone who didn’t have to worry about her ability to walk the next day.  I took the risk and… it wasn’t for me.

If you’re new to Toastmasters, you’re starting at Level 1.  You’re not thinking about Level 4 at all.  But in both levels, it’s about taking risks.

We forget pretty quickly how much of a risk coming to a Toastmasters meeting and joining a club is for most people.  Continue reading “Level 1 and Level 4: Taking Risks”

New Pathways News

Breaking News – 40 minutes too late

Just about 40 minutes after I released last week’s podcast episode, Toastmasters President Daniel Rex’s report to the International Convention was posted on Facebook – including some big news about Pathways. New Pathways news. Continue reading “New Pathways News”

Your Second Pathway: Start Over or Start Again?

Starting the Second Pathway Before Ending the First

Should you finish your first pathway before you start your second pathway?  I know there are people out there who wouldn’t consider their second pathway before finishing their first.

I respect your choice.  Because – it is your choice.

You can work the Toastmaster education program in any way you like.  I know there are people out there who bought every single pathway right from the start and presumably working their way through them.  I know my friend Judy is working on her 4th or 5th pathway right now.  She may even be repeating one of them.

It’s entirely up to you to work this program how you want to.  You just can’t start at the end and work backwards.  That would be silly, right?

Now, after finishing reviewing the Level 3 electives, I’m back to the start.  It doesn’t look right, does it?

Moving to Level 4

It’s my advice that you do the required number of Level 3 electives and move immediately to Level 4.  Why?

1. It’s good for you.

There are many, many excellent speech projects in Level 3 and I do want you to do at least 4 – the essential speech projects I talked about in episode 18.  But staying on Level 3 doesn’t open the really cool projects you’ll find as you move on that will truly challenge you.

The problem with the Level 4 projects is that they’re long projects.  You may find that you’ve got a lot of work to do between the required speeches in them.  This slow-down frustrated me.  I’m in Toastmasters to learn public speaking, but now I have to _____ and here you fill in the blank.  We will talk about Level 4 projects in the weeks to come, but right now, let’s just say – you’re gonna work them.  You need speech projects to fill the time between the Level 4 speeches.

You can do the extra speech projects from Level 3.  The extensive list of electives makes me think that maybe Toastmasters International had this Level 4 lull in mind.

I don’t think about training myself with these Level 3 electives as a bad thing.  In no way is it a waste of time to finish all of these projects.  If you look back to the Competent Communicator manual, many of those Level 3 projects are the same skills that used to be required.

Moving on to Level 4 brings you some challenges to start putting together the pieces of public speaking and leadership.  Up till now, you’ve gotten to work on different parts – speech skills like vocal variety and body language, or some basic introduction to leadership, such as time management or successful collaboration.    We say you work at your own pace in Toastmasters and that’s absolutely true.  But the step from Level 3 to Level 4 is more on the order of a small catapult than a slight rise.  You’re ready for it – go for it!

2. It’s good for your club. 

The Distinguished Club Program is a metric to determine the success of the club to support the members and one of those metrics is completion of education awards.  Level 4 has several interesting options that I think your club should hear about on a regular basis.

So why do I suggest starting your second pathway now?

If you want to do another pathway – if making a choice when you first started in Toastmasters back at your assessment was hard because you wanted more than one – you should know that you can work on as many Pathways as you want to pay for.  If you want to work on a speech-specific pathway like Presentation Mastery and a leadership development pathway like Leadership Development at the same time – you can.  After you finish Level 3 of your first pathway, starting a second during the Level 4 lull is a smart idea.  At the same time that you’re putting together the parts into your own style, if you start a new pathway, you’ll be reminded of what those parts are.  It’s a lot of reinforcement of the basics.

Think about dance – in ballet, the basics at the barre are not neglected even when the dancers are quite able to do pirouettes and jumps.  A musician will practice scales and chords even when they are virtuosos.  In the same way, going back and covering the basics while moving up into the top levels of your pathway makes sense.

How to Pick Your Second Pathway

Picking your second pathway is exactly the same process as picking your first.  You have to take the Assessment.

This isn’t a bad thing – even if you already know what you want to pick.  After all, you’ve probably been a Toastmaster for several months now and learned a lot.  You’ll have a few minutes to examine how far you’ve come in your personal speaking and leadership journey as you answer the questions.

Then go and see what they recommend to you.  It’s very possible that what you want is in the first 3 options they give you, but as we talked about in Episode 2, you can ignore their recommendations and click on the option to see all the pathways and select from that list.

Yes, you start from the beginning.  You’ll give another Ice Breaker.  You’ll get through the Level 1 Project 2 double speech project with a lot less confusion.  And you may take the same Leadership or Communication Style quiz on Level 2 again.

This does aggravate some people.  Let me put this out for your consideration, and feel free to tell me on the Toastmasters 101 Facebook page or here on the website if you disagree with me:

Are you starting over – or starting again?

It’s a matter of mindset.

There is a difference.  Starting over implies that you’ve failed and you have to begin again.  The cookies didn’t come out right, so you have to throw out the dough and start all over.  But starting again… that has a different idea… as if when we start again, we’ve learned something.  We’re going to apply what we’ve learned and build on that now.

If Toastmasters International is listening, I have a few suggestions on how to reorganize this repetition to help the members better.  Just putting that out there…

So what’s going on with Toastmasters 101? 

In Toastmasters 101, we started this podcast in 2016 with an in-depth review of the Competent Communicator manual.  In the reboot in 2019, we started covering Pathways and said we were a podcast for people interested in Toastmasters and new members.  Does it make sense that we’re now talking about Level 4 or starting a second pathway?  Isn’t that pretty advanced?

Toastmasters 102?

I have to acknowledge that this podcast has changed, just as you’ve changed as a result of Toastmasters.  What I thought to do was simple:  create a podcast that explained the complications of getting started with Pathways.

  • I spent 3 weeks talking about the Assessment, which was everyone’s first big hurdle in the program.
  • I covered weirdness of the Level 1 Project 2 double speech project.
  • We talked about meeting roles and Table Topics – not Pathways, but still critical parts of Toastmasters.

Just how far was I going to go?  Is Level 3 too advanced for a podcast called 101?

If I’m talking about Levels 3, 4 and 5, is it still an introduction to Toastmasters?

I think it is.

But how much more can I say about the Assessment?  If you’re looking for more information about it, you can go to the earlier podcasts and listen to them.  Until Toastmasters International decides to change things up, the steps through the program will be the same.

So what should I cover?  I guess I could mention that finally! the pop-up problem has been solved.  As of July of 2019, the project training and instructions won’t open a pop-up window but will open in a new tab.  That’s fantastic!  It’s been one of the biggest complaints about the program and I’m so glad to see TI respond in a positive way.  I am still waiting for Daniel Rex’s promise to open the windows and let us see all the Pathways projects more fully.  In the mean time, I think I’m going to continue to give the basic information about the upper levels projects because that’s what I’m hearing from people that they want it and they need it.

Is it 101 to talk about Level 4 and Level 5 projects?  I think it’s reasonable in an overview course to look at the top as well as the beginning.  So if you’re looking for information about how to get started with Toastmasters, we’ve got that information already for you in the early episodes.  I hope you’ll stick around long enough to want basic information on the upper levels too.

If you think I should start an advanced Toastmasters podcast, let me know that too!

Our podcast music is from

"Mariachi Snooze" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

 

Career Building Speech Projects Level 3

When a prospective member comes through the door and puts their money down at the end of their first meeting, two thoughts come to my mind.  First, this is a kindred spirit, because that’s what I did, and second, their boss sent them.  Come on – we all have seen the members who are here for career building.  That’s fine!  We’re glad to see them!

The reasons a member joins is not very important to me.  Their “why” is their “why” and I’m a whole lot more concerned that we teach the “what” and let them take care of their “why.”

If I’m mentoring a new member and they want to jump to the career building speech projects, I don’t have the power to stop them.  But I will spend time with them showing how these two projects –  Prepare for an Interview and Making Connections with Networking, along with the Using Presentation Software project – are best saved for last, after essential speech skills are understood and practiced. Continue reading “Career Building Speech Projects Level 3”