Chief Judge and the High Performance Leadership Project

Toastmasters Contest Chief Judge

Do you love paperwork?  Then the role of chief judge is yours.  Because there is a boatload of paperwork that the chief judge has to manage.

I guess they called this organizer the Chief Judge because she is – wait for it – in charge of the judging and the judges.  And the ballots.  And the ballot counters and the timers and… all that paperwork.

The chief judge is technically not a judge.  They have no votes in the contest at all.  I tend to think of the Toastmasters contest master as a ringmaster in a circus – the one out front, directing the audience’s attention to the next attract.  The Chief Judge is more like the backstage manager – handling the logistics.

Continue reading “Chief Judge and the High Performance Leadership Project”

Toastmasters Contest Organization: Chair and Contest Master

Toastmasters Contest Organization requires three people.

Ever been to a circus?  Back in the long lost days of traveling circuses, there would be huge tents with three staging areas called rings and each would have an act going at the same time.  The smart the circus company used one tent to cover everyone, but no one was too far away from the action on one of the stages.  Besides, there were peanuts.  Who can hate an event with peanuts?

Contests are like circuses.  There’s a whole lot going on that the audience is oblivious to and that’s a good thing.  They are there to be entertained.  They don’t want to know about who’s cleaning up after the animals or how the clowns get into the car.  But without that organization in the background, the show won’t go on.

Toastmasters Contest Guidelines

Contests don’t just happen.  It’s not like we say, “Oh, today, let’s have a contest that may send a member to the international convention .” Continue reading “Toastmasters Contest Organization: Chair and Contest Master”